Home | More Videos | About Us | Contact | Subscribe | Donate


Attack of the Drones w/ Jason Bermas

Program length - 5:34


Subscribe to Brasscheck TV

Your e-mail address is kept absolutely private
We make it easy to unsubscribe at any time

Navigation:    Home    Back    More videos like this

Related article...


 Drones for “urban warfare”

Manufacturers are targeting U.S. police forces for sales, as drones move from the Middle East to Main Street

By Jefferson Morley

In November 2010, a police lieutenant from Parma, Ohio, asked Vanguard Defense Industries if the Texas-based drone manufacturer could mount a “grenade launcher and/or 12-gauge shotgun” on its ShadowHawk drone for U.S. law enforcement agencies. The answer was yes.

Last month, police officers from 10 public safety departments around the Washington, D.C., metropolitan area gathered at an airfield in southern Maryland to view a demonstration of a camera-equipped aerial drone — first developed for military use — that flies at speeds up to 20 knots or hovers for as long as an hour.

And in late March, South Korean police and military flew a Canadian-designed drone as part of “advance security preparations” for the Nuclear Security Summit in Seoul where protesters clashed with police.

In short, the business of marketing drones to law enforcement is booming. Now that Congress has ordered the Federal Aviation Administration to open up U.S. airspace to unmanned vehicles, the aerial surveillance technology first developed in the battle space of Iraq, Afghanistan and Pakistan is fueling a burgeoning market in North America. And even though they’re moving from war zones to American markets, the language of combat and conflict remains an important part of their sales pitch — a fact that ought to concern citizens worried about the privacy implications of domestic drones.

“As part of the push to increase uses of civilian drones,” the Wall Street Journal reported last week, nearly 50 companies are developing some 150 different systems, ranging from miniature models to those with wingspans comparable to airliners.” Law enforcement and public safety agencies are a prime target of this industry, which some predict will have $6 billion in U.S. sales by 2016.

Continue reading here

Brasscheck TV's answer to the normal human question: "What can I do?"
For more Offensive technology: videos, click here

See the complete catalog of
brasscheck tv videos

About Us | Information for subscribers | Privacy Policy | Contact