Home | More Videos | About Us | Contact | Subscribe | Donate


CISPA: Nightmare Cybersecurity Bill

Program length - 8:44


Subscribe to Brasscheck TV

Your e-mail address is kept absolutely private
We make it easy to unsubscribe at any time

Navigation:    Home    Back    More videos like this

Related article...


Move over SOPA & PIPA - here comes CISPA - internet censorship

By Anne Sewell
Digital Journal

In the wake of SOPA and PIPA, there is yet another terrifying bill on the table. The Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act (or CISPA for short) which is currently being discussed by Congress.

In Washington, Congress is discussing the best way to avert the ongoing cyberattacks and some legislators have put forward a new act which, if it passes Congress, will allow the government access to personal correspondence of any person of their choosing.

Much like the Big Brother tactics in the United Kingdom recently, this bill will likely cause an outcry of condemnation and criticism, as happened with the deceased SOPA and PIPA bills.

The title of this controversial act is H.R. 3523 and it has been dubbed the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act (or CISPA for short). It is feared that CISPA is far worse than SOPA and PIPA in its possible effects on the internet.

While this paper has been created under the guise of being a necessary weapon in the U.S. war against cyberattacks, the wording of the paper is vague and broad. It is thought that the act could allow Congress to circumvent existing exemptions to online privacy laws and would allow the monitoring and censorship of any user and also stop online communications which they deem disruptive to the government or to private parties.

Critics say that CISPA would give any federal entity that claims it is threatened by online interactions the ability to take action against the "perpetrator". Unlike the SOPA and PIPA acts which were eventually discarded after a successful online campaign, widespread recognition of what the latest proposed law will do has yet to surface to the same degree.

Kendall Burman of the Center for Democracy and Technology tells RT:

“We have a number of concerns with something like this bill that creates sort of a vast hole in the privacy law to allow government to receive these kinds of information.”

She states that the bill, as it stands, allows the U.S. government to involve itself in any online correspondence if it believes there is reason to suspect cyber crime.

As with other recent attempts at internet censorship that have been discussed in Congress, the wording within the CISPA allows the government to interpret the law so broadly, that any online communication or interaction could then be suspect, and monitored without the knowledge of the parties concerned.

Read more: http://www.digitaljournal.com/article/322396#ixzz1r5mwo4I1

Brasscheck TV's answer to the normal human question: "What can I do?"
For more Censorship: videos, click here

See the complete catalog of
brasscheck tv videos

About Us | Information for subscribers | Privacy Policy | Contact